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AASEP's mission is to establish a sense of community among special education professionals throughout the United States.  Achievement of this vision requires........

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Recent AASEP News

Sign Language Users Have Better Reaction Times and Peripheral Vision

Posted: 02/15/17 16:33

People who use British Sign Language (BSL) have better reaction times in their peripheral vision, a new study from the University of Sheffield has found. The findings, revealed by scientists from the University's Academic Unit of Ophthalmology and Orthoptics, show that hearing adults learning a visual-spatial language such as BSL has a positive impact on visual field response -- something which is highly beneficial in many sports and when driving. Dr. Charlotte Codina, lead author of the...

The 9 Things People with Learning Disabilities Want You to Know

Posted: 02/08/17 19:34

How often do you see two famous people with learning disabilities (LDs) in the same movie? Well, probably more often than you think. Since many people with LDs are creative and unconventional, it's common for them to...

Why "High Functioning" Autism is So Challenging

Posted: 02/01/17 11:06

The autism spectrum is very large.  If you think of it as a rainbow (or a bell curve), you'll note that there's an awful lot of the spectrum that is at neither one end nor the other -- but somewhere in the middle. At this point in history, we don't have good information to tell us whether MOST people on the autism spectrum are "somewhere in the middle," but it is clear that the lion's share of media attention goes to folks at the high and the low ends of the spectrum --...

Expert: Wandering an All-too-Common Problem for Children with Autism

Posted: 01/25/17 12:42

Wandering by children with autism is common, dangerous, and at times, deadly. On Monday at about 9 p.m., 7-year-old Tanner Vick died when he wandered out of his Franklin County home and was hit by a car on Darius Pearce Road. Vick had autism and played baseball for the Miracle League of Franklin County. According to a neighbor, Vicks' mother went to the bathroom and when she returned to the room, he was gone. David Laxton, with the Autism Society of North Carolina, described the...

Adderall Uses and Effects on The Brain: How ADHD Medication Impacts Neural Connections Over Time

Posted: 01/17/17 11:29

Adderall/Dexedrine can be neurotoxic in the long run (by damaging dopamine neurons) while Ritalin does not have as much neurotoxicity potential. Surprisingly, when Ritalin and Adderall are mixed together, Ritalin can actually help counteract Adderall's neurotoxicity potential. Whether or not Adderall's neurotoxicity applies to those who take doses relevant to ADD is unclear. Most of the studies use amphetamine does higher than those used for treating ADHD, but Amphetamine Treatment...

Stuttering Linked to Reduced Blood Flow in Area of Brain Associated with Language

Posted: 01/11/17 18:44

A study led by researchers at Children's Hospital Los Angeles demonstrates what lead investigator Bradley Peterson, MD, calls "a critical mass of evidence" of a common underlying lifelong vulnerability in both children and adults who stutter. They discovered that regional cerebral blood flow is reduced in the Broca's area -- the region in the frontal lobe of the brain linked to speech production -- in persons who stutter. More severe stuttering is associated with even greater...

Why Some Companies Are Trying to Hire More People on the Autism Spectrum

Posted: 01/06/17 00:56

Interest in what's called neurodiversity is growing at American companies. This year, the accounting firm EY (formerly known as Ernst & Young) has been piloting a program to employ people with autism in order to explore the benefits of having workers of different cognitive abilities, such as greater productivity and building a more talented workforce. According to a recent study by Drexel University, 58 percent of young adults with autism are unemployed. And yet, many of them have...

The Impact of Child Abuse Can Last a Lifetime

Posted: 12/29/16 13:06

The traumatic effects of child abuse and neglect can persist for decades, often with substantial economic consequences, researchers report. "We found associations of child neglect and abuse with adult socioeconomic circumstances at age 50," said lead author Snehal Pinto Pereira. Physical, social or emotional abuse in childhood was linked at midlife to a greater risk of time off from work due to long-term sickness, said Pereira, a research associate at University College London's...

Child Abuse Cases in Army Families May Be Under-Reported

Posted: 12/21/16 17:30

Child abuse within U.S. Army families may be significantly under-reported, a new study suggests. Researchers found that only one-fifth of diagnosed child abuse and neglect cases among U.S. Army-dependent children from 2004 to 2007 had a substantiated report with the Army's Family Advocacy Program (FAP). The program is responsible for investigating and treating child abuse. That's less than half the rate (44 percent) of child abuse cases substantiated by civilian Child Protective Services,...

Working Out the Genetic Risk for ADHD

Posted: 12/14/16 11:35

Genetics play a strong part in the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but the path from a gene to risk for the disorder has remained a black box to researchers.. A new study in Biological Psychiatry suggests how the risk gene ADGRL3 (LPHN3) might work. ADGRL3 encodes the protein latrophilin 3, which regulates communication between brain cells. According to the study, a common variation of the gene associated with ADHD disrupts...

Parents Should Avoid Pressuring Young Children Over Grades

Posted: 12/07/16 09:22

New research from ASU suggests parents shouldn't obsess over grades and extracurricular activities for young schoolchildren, especially if such ambitions come at the expense of social skills and kindness. Doing so, the study says, can work against helping kids become well-adjusted and successful later in life. "When parents emphasize children's achievement much more than their compassion and decency during the formative years, they are sowing the seeds of stress and poorer...

Mothers' Early Support Boosts Children's Later Math Achievement

Posted: 11/30/16 16:26

Early math knowledge is as important as early literacy for children's subsequent achievement. In fact, research has shown that early math skills predict later school success better than early reading skills, and can even predict income in adulthood. Yet little research has directly examined how parents' support of early math learning affects children's development of later math skills. Now a new longitudinal study has found that young children whose mothers supported them during play,...

A Father's Influence Makes for Better Grades

Posted: 11/23/16 09:12

The warmth of a father's love has a special influence on young people, and makes them feel optimistic and determined to strive for greater things. It also boosts the math grades of teenage girls and the language ability of boys, says Dr. Marie-Anne Suizzo of the University of Texas in the US, in an article in Springer's journal Sex Roles. Adolescents from low-income families in particular are more likely than their middle-class peers to underachieve and to drop...

Few States Have Plans for Kids Returning to Class After Concussion

Posted: 11/16/16 09:15

All U.S. states have "return-to-play" laws designed to protect young athletes who've suffered a concussion. But only a handful have regulations on handling kids' return to the classroom, researchers report. As of May 2016, only eight states had "return-to-learn" laws aimed at managing kids' concussion recovery, the researchers found. The findings highlight a gap, the study authors said, since some children who suffer concussions are athletes -- but all of them are...

School Principals Shape Students' Values Via School Climate

Posted: 11/09/16 08:34

Over time, students' personal values become more similar to those of their school principal, according to new research published inPsychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The findings indicate that principals' values are linked with aspects of school climate which are, in turn, linked with students' own values. "Given the vast amount of time children spend in school, it is important to assess the impact that schools have on...

Docs: Infants Should Share Parents' Room to Help Prevent SIDS-But Not in Same Bed

Posted: 11/02/16 18:20

Infants should sleep in the same room as their parents -- but not in the same bed -- to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics advise. The recommendations call for babies to share their parents' bedroom for at least the first 6 months of life and, ideally, for the first year. This could reduce the risk of sudden death by as much as 50 percent, the guideline authors say. "Room sharing makes a lot of sense,"...

Folinic Acid Could Help Children with Autism Communicate Better

Posted: 10/26/16 16:08

Prescription doses of folinic acid, which is a reduced form of a B vitamin known as folate, could help improve the language and communication skills of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). These are the preliminary findings from a placebo-controlled trial in which children were randomized to receive either high-dose folinic acid or a placebo, says lead author Richard Frye of Arkansas Children's Research Institute in the US. The study, which is published in Springer Nature's...

JAASEP - WINTER 2017

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Did You Know...?

According to the most recent report from the United States Department of Education, Specific Learning Disabilities is the largest disability area that qualifies children for special education services at school. This is approximately 50% of all students with disabilities.

To learn more about Specific Learning Disabilities visit Professional Resources on this topic.

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