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Board Certification in Special Education

Professional Board Certifcation in Special Education is now available through AASEP.

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AASEP's mission is to establish a sense of community among special education professionals throughout the United States.  Achievement of this vision requires........

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AASEP PEER REVIEW JOURNAL (JAASEP)

The Journal of the American Academy of Special Education Professionals (JAASEP) is now accepting Papers, Articles, Research Studies, Book Reviews, and Commentaries for upcoming issues: Click Here to learn more..

 


AASEP MONITOR

AASEP Monitor Keeps You Informed

Be kept up to date with all of the latest information in special education.  The AASEP Monitor is the electronic news service that keeps AASEP members current in the field of special education today. (READ MORE)

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Recent AASEP News

Anxiety May Alter Processing of Emotions in People with Autism

Posted: 09/20/17 11:43

A brain region that processes emotions, including fear, tends to be smaller in children who have both autism and anxiety than in those who have autism alone, according to a new study.
The findings suggest that the difference in volume of this region, called the amygdala, is related to how these individuals process emotions. The amygdala is thought to be involved in autism, but exactly how has been unclear. Some studies have reported that it is larger in children with...

How Reading and Writing with Your Child Boost More than Just Literacy

Posted: 09/13/17 17:51

Children who read and write at home -- whether for assignments or just for fun -- are building long-term study and executive function skills, according to a paper from the University of Washington. And while home literacy activities have already been associated with higher test scores, the new study shows these activities also provide students with tools for lifetime success. "People who are good students tend to become good employees by being on time and putting forward their best...

Do Fidget Spinners Help?

Posted: 09/07/17 16:46

A host of fidget gadgets, designed to help people focus, have suddenly caught on in cities. Some are discussing their hidden benefits, while others dismiss them as "distracting toys", or a marketing ploy. We asked some experts to weigh in on the issue. "Fidgeting can be defined as making small repeated movements, especially of the hands and feet, through nervousness or excitement. It is a very common 'semi-voluntary' movement witnessed in many normal people. Anything from a...

Exposure to Certain Flame-Retardant Chemicals in Pregnancy May be Linked to Lower Intelligence in Children

Posted: 08/30/17 15:41

Exposure to certain flame-retardant chemicals in pregnancy may be linked to lower intelligence in children, a new research review suggests. The synthetic chemicals are known as polybrominated diphenyl ethers or PBDEs. Although phased out in manufacturing in the United States, they remain in many products, including old couches and other household items, building materials and electronics, the researchers said. Together, the studies reviewed suggested that IQs dip by 3.7 points for every...

Yoga Effective at Reducing Symptoms of Depression

Posted: 08/24/17 17:30

People who suffer from depression may want to look to yoga as a complement to traditional therapies as the practice appears to lessen symptoms of the disorder, according to studies presented at the 125th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association. "Yoga has become increasingly popular in the West, and many new yoga practitioners cite stress-reduction and other mental health concerns as their primary reason for practicing," said Lindsey Hopkins, PhD, of the San...

Toddlers Begin Learning Rules of Reading, Writing at Very Early Age, Study Finds

Posted: 08/16/17 14:03

Even the proudest of parents may struggle to find some semblance of meaning behind the seemingly random mish-mash of letters that often emerge from a toddler's first scribbled and scrawled attempts at putting words on paper. But new research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that children as young as 3 already are beginning to recognize and follow important rules and patterns governing how letters in the English language fit together to make words. The study, published this...

How to Succeed in College with a Disability

Posted: 08/10/17 13:13

If you're entering college as a student with a disability, the first thing you should know is that you're not alone. In a study of approximately 11,000 young adults with disabilities, nearly 20 percent were found to have attended a four-year college or university at some point after high school. And, like all students, you should have a sense of pride in what the college experience can do for you: You've demonstrated self-determination in deciding to take classes, meet new friends and...

Language Development Starts in the Womb

Posted: 08/03/17 10:29

A month before they are born, fetuses carried by American mothers-to-be can distinguish between someone speaking to them in English and Japanese. Using non-invasive sensing technology from the University of Kansas Medical Center for the first time for this purpose, a group of researchers from KU's Department of Linguistics has shown this in-utero language discrimination. Their study published in the journal NeuroReport has implications for fetal research in other fields, the lead author...

Do People Who are Blind Express Their Emotions in the Same Way as People Who Can See?

Posted: 07/26/17 15:45

Facial expressions play a powerful role in social interactions from birth to adulthood. Fear, joy, anger -- all our emotions are articulated and understood thanks to universal codes. Common sense sees this enterprise as an act of imitation: children imitate their parents by reproducing the facial expression linked to each emotion. But if this is the case, does the same hold true for people who were born blind? Do they show their emotions in the same way? The UNIGE researchers analyzed 21...

Williams Syndrome: What It's Like Being A Kid Who Has The 'Opposite Of Autism'

Posted: 07/19/17 10:29

The first time I met Eli, in the late winter of 2011, he was waiting for me at his front door. Gayle had told him to expect a visitor: a writer who wanted to observe him "in his natural habitat," as Gayle put it. She always waited to deliver exciting news like this-a guest!-until the last possible moment, so the anticipation wouldn't overwhelm him. Still, Eli had been restlessly awaiting my arrival for the two hours since he'd gotten home from school. At first, all I saw were...

Child Safety or Parental Duty: New Study Maps Out Core Concepts in the Vaccination Debate

Posted: 07/10/17 10:54

The recent measles outbreak in Minnesota -- by June, new cases of the disease in that state surpassed nationwide totals for all of 2016 -- has been a sobering reminder of how highly concentrated populations of vaccination skeptics can elevate an entire community's risk of infection. Around the edges of every headline-grabbing outbreak, there's a vast range of opinions being circulated about the risks and benefits of early childhood immunization. The vaccination debate maintains a constant...

What's the Link Between a Low-Income Status and a Kid's Chance of Developing ADHD?

Posted: 07/06/17 10:48

Does growing up in impoverished circumstances increase a child's chance of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or does it intensify existing symptoms? Marian F. Earls, director of pediatric programs at Community Care of North Carolina who also serves on the guidelines committee for people with ADHD at the American Academy of Pediatrics, says that it's a "bit of a chicken-and-egg situation" in that there may be some overlap. Ultimately, she believes that...

People with Disabilities Hit Waves During Surfing Event At Jersey Shore

Posted: 06/26/17 11:38

It happens in 12 cities across the country, but on Sunday, Life Rolls On rolled on to Wildwood Crest in New Jersey for the "They Will Surf Again" event. On the waves, many feel limitless. "One of the beautiful things about being in the water is the freedom," said Heather Markham. Because on land, some are paralyzed by spinal cord injuries or disabilities. "I actually have muscular dystrophy," Markham said. "So I have no push and no ability to...

People with Disabilities Hit Waves During Surfing Event At Jersey Shore

Posted: 06/26/17 11:38

It happens in 12 cities across the country, but on Sunday, Life Rolls On rolled on to Wildwood Crest in New Jersey for the "They Will Surf Again" event. On the waves, many feel limitless. "One of the beautiful things about being in the water is the freedom," said Heather Markham. Because on land, some are paralyzed by spinal cord injuries or disabilities. "I actually have muscular dystrophy," Markham said. "So I have no push and no ability to...

Kids and Concussions

Posted: 06/16/17 11:16

Every year, hundreds of thousands of school-aged children get concussions, a mild form of traumatic brain injury. But the after effects of a concussion can be serious. Experts from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), share what you can do to protect your child from this injury and its consequences. A concussion is a type of brain injury caused by a bump or blow...

Improving Adolescents' Social and Emotional Lives Must Go Beyond Teaching Them Skills

Posted: 06/15/17 17:44

School programs designed to educate children and adolescents on how to understand and manage emotions, relationships and academic goals must go beyond improving the skills of the individuals to create a respectful climate and allow adolescents more autonomy in decision making, according to psychology research at The University of Texas at Austin. Neuroscientists have identified both early childhood and adolescence as windows of opportunity for development; and social and emotional...

Studying Children at Increased Risk of Suicide

Posted: 06/08/17 11:04

Teenagers injured through drinking, drug abuse or self-harming have a five-fold increased risk of dying from suicide in the next decade. Children and young people admitted to hospital in England with injuries related to self-harming, drugs or alcohol faced an increased risk of killing themselves over the following 10 years, according to new research. While previous studies have shown that children and adolescents who self-harm are at a higher risk of suicide, the paper by academics from...

Special Diets, Supplements for Autism Still a Question Mark

Posted: 06/01/17 19:40

Parents of children with autism often try diet changes or supplements to ease symptoms of the disorder, but a new review concludes there's no solid evidence that any work. After analyzing 19 clinical trials, researchers found little proof that dietary tactics-from gluten-free foods to fish oil supplements-helped children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Some studies showed positive effects, while others found nothing, the researchers said. Overall, the trials were too small and...

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Did You Know...?

According to the most recent report from the United States Department of Education, Specific Learning Disabilities is the largest disability area that qualifies children for special education services at school. This is approximately 50% of all students with disabilities.

To learn more about Specific Learning Disabilities visit Professional Resources on this topic.

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